Tea

Samurai means “to serve.”

Tamurai means “to serve through tea.”

AT TAMURAI TEA OUR GOAL IS TO HONOR THE SPIRIT OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING.

We begin with the selection and consumption of high quality tea. Through the consumption of tea, we make the connection to the earth and the sun. As our astronauts and NASA researchers continue to learn, only the connection to our earth, our atmospherically filtered sunlight, and that which they produce can sustain life as we know it.   Through this connection and creation, our mind, body, and soul are supplied with a cascade of life sustaining nutrients and antioxidants. Certain combinations of these nutrients are found only in the various teas created by our wonderful planet. The teas we support and supply are organic due to the fact tea is one of the few consumable products which makes its way directly from field to cup without any cleaning or washing. If a tea plant or tea field is sprayed with toxic harmful chemicals or fertilizers, they are consumed with the tea.  An additional consideration is that when consuming the highest quality of tea: the first growth, the earliest picking; the highest concentration of nutrients are consumed.  Older tea leaves are found to be out of balance, with higher concentrations of minerals that may be harmful to our health.

Nature designs tea to be consumed at a slower pace, so we encourage tea to explore the internal universe within each of us. As we unfold the discoveries within, we can then make the peaceful and harmonious connections with those we encounter in life. These connections whether individual or shared bring much satisfaction and joy. It is with this spirit of joy we thank you for sharing your journey of tea, spirit, and life. It is with great honor that we recommend and make available the products and services contained within.

 “I have three treasures, which I guard and keep.  The first is compassion.  The second is economy.  The third is humility.  From compassion comes courage.  From economy comes the means to be generous.  From humility comes responsible leadership.”  —Lao-Tse

Once we are on the journey of balance, we are then ready to seek the harmony of the “me/we” relationship that allows the healing of our world and those of its inhabitants.  We learn of how we connect and influence community.  We learn and share the vibrations that are so subtle, but yet so powerful.  These vibrations can only be felt with the heart and measured by the health and harmony of our internal and external environments.

We begin our quest with tea, share it through meditation & prayer, and grow it through our understanding and developing awareness as keys to unlock the secrets within.  Meditation & prayer unfolds Lao Tse’s compassionate courage, tea flowers the economy of generosity, and our growing humility through understanding allows us to lead others by example.


 

Whiskey and Tea by theglenlivet.com

WHISKY AND TEA

 

Tea and whisky have enjoyed a centuries-long romance. Like whisky, tea is a time-honored beverage that calls on hundreds of years of skill and tradition. Tea also has a vibrant history, and a reach that today touches every corner of the globe. In addition to their prominence, the two make a particularly good match because their flavors work in harmony. Like in any good marriage, they soften each other’s edges. They also heighten each others’ aromatics, complementing each other through shared notes of smoke, malt and tropical fruits. Delicious companions indeed. The pairing of whisky and tea has taken on many forms through the years, and continues to evolve today. How many of the following pairings have you tried?

 

THE HOT TODDY

 

The Hot Toddy, a much-loved Scottish invention that combines whisky with lemon, honey and hot water or tea, has been enjoyed since at least the 18th century. Sometimes spices such as cinnamon or cloves are added, or sugar is used instead of honey. Whatever the modification, Hot Toddy drinkers tend to believe that their own special formula is the perfect recipe. The famous concoction is universally cherished as a sweet, warming tonic against cold weather, a trying day or the threat of flu. In 19th-century Britain, it was common for doctors to prescribe a Hot Toddy as a cure for almost anything, from stomach pain to insomnia. Today it is sipped more to soothe colds ­– whisky to fortify, tea to warm, lemon to boost vitamins – or as a pick-me-up for a moment of comfort in our busy world. Next time you feel out of sorts, a Hot Toddy might just be the thing to get you back on your feet.

 

BLENDED WHISKY AND GREEN TEA

 

While the Hot Toddy has a long history in Scotland, the classic pairing of whisky and tea is taking on a crisp new form in Asia. China has become one of the top 10 consumers of Scotch for the first time, in part because of the discovery of a bold new way to enjoy it: mixing blended whisky with chilled tea, especially green tea. The drink is usually served as a highball, over ice, with about one part whisky, three parts tea. The tea is usually lightly sweetened. The soft, vegetal, grassy flavors of most green tea means it adds to, rather than overpowers, even the lightest whiskies. Often, a green tea will highlight citrusy notes in whisky. The result is a refreshing, breezy drink ideal for summer picnics and sultry evenings.

 

SINGLE MALTS AND FINE TEAS

 

The popular Asian mix of whisky and green tea is just one new development in the tantalizing tea and whisky duo. There are also now tea companies that bottle fine teas especially to be drunk with single malt whisky. Made from hand-picked, loose-leaf tea sourced from around the world, these teas make ideal partners for exceptional whiskies. Like fine wines, both whisky and tea develop in the glass. Their flavors evolve, with some notes softening and others becoming more pronounced. This makes them well-suited cohorts for a relaxed home tasting. If you would like to try these new takes on whisky-meets-tea, all it requires is a selection of teas, a few bottles of The Glenlivet and some willing companions. Your friends may not always share your opinion on which pairings work best, but flavor – like love – is always a matter of personal preference.

 

 

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TEA & HEALTH by Rishi Tea & Botanicals

TEA & HEALTH

At Rishi Tea & Botanicals we believe that a healthy life is a balanced life and although we are not doctors and do not make specific health claims, we recognize the wisdom of traditional uses and remedies of herbs, teas and botanicals. When you include tea and botanicals in your diet it can increase a sense of wellness that creates positive self-care habits and rituals that will promote a healthy and balanced life.

For many centuries and through countless cultures, tea has been recognized as a healthful beverage for the mind, body, and soul. In today’s society, artificial beverages have become pervasive, and we believe tea offers the perfect alternative because of its numerous health benefits. The composition of the Chinese character for tea (“cha”) reveals how we can explore a natural and healthy existence through this timeless drink. The character depicts three elements: ‘grass’ on the top, ‘human’ in the center, and ‘tree’ on the bottom. This character reveals the essence of tea and its connection to nature.  Japanese culture also recognizes this connection in Teasim. This was first explored by Okakura Kakuzo in his 1906 essay entitled, “The Book of Tea.”  茶 cha=tea grass + human + tree.

In the traditional tea cultures of East Asia, it is common knowledge that different varieties of Camellia sinensis (tea) offer unique energies and effects on the mind and body. With these traditions and their roots in “food as medicine” in mind, we will explore some of the health benefits of tea.

What is Elderberry and What are its Benefits?

What is Elderberry and What are its Benefits?

Elderberry is highly valued as a medicinal herb and food in many cultures. The plant grows as a small tree or shrub and produces flowers, followed by berries. The anthocyanidins in elderberries are thought to have immunomodulating effects and possibly anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects.

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Tea & Health – Antioxidants

Tea & Health – Antioxidants

Camellia Sinensis (the tea plant) contains antioxidants in the form of tea polyphenols and catechins. Some polyphenols and catechins are known to lower inflammation, reduce blood sugar and cholesterol as well as support arterial wall health. There have been some studies that suggest that some polyphenols slow the loss of bone density as well.

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Tea & Health – Adaptogens

Tea & Health – Adaptogens

An adaptogen is an herb or plant which aids in the body’s resistance to stressors. Adaptogens are typically used to aid in relieving stress-induced fatigue, mental illness, and behavioral disorders.

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Tea & Health – Nootropics

Tea & Health – Nootropics

Colloquially, many accept that the term nootropic refers to a substance used to enhance memory or other cognitive functions, including facilitating learning in a healthy brain.

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Tulsi – The Queen of Herbs

Tulsi – The Queen of Herbs

Tulsi is one of the cornerstones in Ayurvedic tradition. Ayurveda, translating from Sanskrit as “the Science of Life,” is a healing science originating in India over 5,000 years ago.

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Tea and Health – Antioxidants by Rishi Tea & Botanicals

Tea and Health – Antioxidants

Antioxidants May Help Neutralize Free Radicals

Antioxidants are substances that can prevent or slow damage to cells caused by free radicals or unstable molecules that the body produces as a reaction to varying types of stress. Free radicals caused by internal inflammation, UV exposure, first or second-hand smoke, and pollution have been linked to a whole host of stress-related diseases, common in our society today. The free radicals intermingle with other molecules contained within cells and cause oxidative damage to proteins, membranes, and genes.  Antioxidants are said to help neutralize free radicals in our bodies and therefore boost overall health. 

Tea and Antioxidants

Camellia sinensis (the botanical name for the tea plant) contains antioxidants in the form of tea polyphenols and catechins, including epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin (EGC), Thearubigins (TR), and others. Green teas contain EGCG, a catechin renowned for its effect on lowering inflammation and antioxidant activity. Black teas have EGCG in lower amounts but also contain complex polyphenols, specifically, Theaflavin and Thearubigin. Complex tea polyphenols in dark teas and black teas like Thearubigin are known to reduce blood sugar and cholesterol as well as support arterial wall health. There have been some studies that suggest these polyphenols can aid in slowing the loss of bone density.

 

Antioxidants in the Form of Polyphenols May Help Mitigate Age-Related or Degenerative Conditions

Polyphenols are found in a wide variety of plant foods, including tea, red wine, dark chocolate, olive oil, and berries. Researchers believe polyphenols may help mitigate age-related or degenerative conditions. However, this has not been proven conclusively, so the FDA does not permit food companies to make specific claims about tea and disease prevention. We suggest tea drinkers interested in the health benefits of tea simply enjoy a variety of tea types. 

Some of the most water-soluble, easily extracted components in tea are the polyphenols (antioxidants), so extended steeping is not necessary. Brewing tea for longer periods of time will result in an overly strong, bitter cup. For the best experience, we recommend following the specific brewing recommendations listed with each tea. 

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